• 3 to 5 Minutes

    - Rapid handmade furniture


    Is it possible to make unique handmade furniture really fast? Is speed the contradiction to skills? Can lack of time lead to new methods? Is there an aesthetics of the shortcut? Is speed bad?

    This project is a continuation of the recent “3 to 5 Seconds – Rapid handmade production” where Jenny Nordberg explored speed in her search for ways to combine different properties of the mass produced and the handmade. This work is like many other of Nordberg’s projects a part of a larger and ongoing work about how we produce and consume today, how we’ve done historically and how it might could be different onwards.

    If the first project was about examining speed in a handmade and craft oriented context, this second project is just as much about using speed as a method to achieve new expressions and procedures. The design, materials and details are all the result of the lack of time. For example – the coating does not cover the whole surface, details are few and imperfect, assembly screws are visible and the design is restrained.

    “3 to 5 minutes – Rapid handmade furniture” explores the making of furniture by hand under time pressure often to found in mass production. Each piece of furniture must be made within the timespan of tree to five minutes. All production steps are clocked and added together as the designer turns herself into an artisanal assembly line. Materials and components are to be found in regular hardware stores as well as the pre-cutting of the board material. The project includes two easy chairs with additional pillows, a small trolley and a dining table with four chairs, all together made in less than an hour.

    An easy chairs with additional pillow an the small trolley together with objects from 3 to 5 Seconds – Rapid handmade production project will be shown at the Stockholm Furniture & Light fair 3-8 February. The whole project including a production setting complemented by a shop will be exhibited in a solo exhibition at Vandalorum 28/2 – 6/4 2015.

    Thanks to Kvadrat textiles.